OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF AIA UTAH

Pub 2 2021-2022 Issue 1

Enos-Wall-Mansion

South Temple Walking Tour

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This story appears in the
AIA Utah Magazine Pub 2 2021-2022 Issue 1

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In support of the Utah Center for Architecture’s educational mission and new ARCHtober events series, cityhomeCOLLECTIVE will be sponsoring a walking tour of South Temple architecture on the evening of Oct. 7. More details for this event and other UFCA plans throughout October are coming soon. cityhomeCOLLECTIVE is an independently owned real estate brokerage and interior design firm based in Salt Lake City and a proud advocate for outstanding architecture. Visit cityhomecollective.com to learn more.

For those looking to get outside, we’ve compiled a walking tour of some of our favorite buildings on one of our all-time favorite streets – South Temple. Let’s take a walk, shall we?

Enos-Wall-Mansion
Enos Wall Mansion
Governor’s-Plaza
Governor’s Plaza
cityhomeCOLLECTIVE-HQ
cityhomeCOLLECTIVE HQ
Masonic-Temple
Masonic Temple
The-Mayflower-Building
Bonneville Tower
The-Mayflower-Building
The Mayflower Building
The-Maryland-Building
The Maryland Building

ALTA CLUB

Frederick Albert Hale designed this stunner, finished in 1898 and perched on the corner of South Temple and State Street in Italian Renaissance style. There’s loads of history to be found inside, but the exterior is just as stunning. (100 E S Temple)

BIG-O TIRES

One of Downtown’s most unexpectedly sweet structures is Big-O – on the corner of South Temple and 200 East – sports some of the dreamiest mid-century arches in the city. (178 E S Temple)

CATHEDRAL OF THE MADELEINE

Constructed between 1900 and 1909, this Neo-Romanesque masterpiece is one of the most stunning structures in the city. Admire from the outside but be sure to head inside for even more architectural goodness. (331 E S Temple)

IBM BUILDING NO.1

Completed in 1960 and home to IBM’s first Utah office, this mid-century structure is most notable for the undulating white arches that preface it. (348 E S Temple)

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH

Just up the street from the Cathedral of the Madeleine, this structure — composed of red sandstone and designed by architect Walter Ware — is a staggering example of the Scottish Gothic Revival style. (12 C St E)

IBM BUILDING NO.2

The most notably brutalist building on the block, IBM #2, is an austere concrete structure that boasts plenty in the way of simple but elegant details. (420 E S Temple)

MRS. BACKER’S PASTRY SHOP

By now, you surely need a refuel and/or warm-up, and this adorable Salt Lake City mainstay (since 1941!) is not only home to our favorite neon sign in the valley, but a mean gingersnap, as well. You’d do well to pop in for a half-dozen. Thank us later. (434 E S Temple)

STEINER AMERICAN BUILDING

Rather inconspicuous at first glance, Steiner American Building (completed in 1967) is actually rife with Wrightian architectural elements on par with some of the city’s best mid-century structures. This one is worth stopping and admiring — its details don’t disappoint. (505 E S Temple)

GOVERNOR’S PLAZA

Governor’s Plaza houses some truly excellent flats but isn’t too shabby itself, aesthetically speaking. Completed in 1983, its tiered concrete silhouette offers a welcome contrast to some of the street’s more traditional structures. (560 E S Temple)

UTAH GOVERNOR’S MANSION

(Thomas and Jennie Kearns Mansion) Completed in 1902, this Chateau-Esque manse (designed by Carl M. Neuhausen) underwent a significant renovation after a fire in 1993 destroyed much of the original structure. Pro tip: Come December, the exterior’s holiday lights display here are top-notch. (603 E S Temple)

CITYHOMECOLLECTIVE

This spot is understandably near and dear to our hearts. That said, coming from a quasi-objective perspective, we think that the marble and glass facade holds plenty of design weight no matter the building’s occupants. Be sure to pop in for a quick hello should you find yourself passing by. (645 E S Temple)

SALT LAKE MASONIC TEMPLE

The lore surrounding this building is compelling on its own, but the actual design of the structure is plenty intriguing, as well. A prime example of Egyptian Revival architecture, this spot has served as a striking addition to South Temple since its completion in 1927. (650 E S Temple)

BONNEVILLE TOWER

A pristine mid-century modern achievement, the Bonneville was designed by M.E. Harris, Jr. and completed in 1964. To this day, the building serves as a delightful throwback to some of the 20th century’s most aesthetically inclined times and the units inside sport views for days. (777 E S Temple)

THE MARYLAND

The Neo-Classical style of The Maryland (completed in 1912 and designed by Bernard Mecklenburg) is clear in the exaggerated ornamentation. We’re a bit partial to this building and, in particular, the diversity in design of its fab units. (839 E S Temple)

JANE’S HOUSE

Built in 1908, this Georgian Revivalist home boasts stunning architecture and equally impressive landscaping. And, if you find yourself lucky enough to enter the home — it often serves as a venue for workshops and retreats — be sure to check out the incredible art collection spread throughout. (1229 E S Temple)

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